Surveillance Strategies

The “16x Growth” Business of Ultra High-Definition Surveillance

February 1, 2012

In today’s surveillance market we exceedingly judge ourselves by the number of megapixels of a camera.  However, when trying to display all of those pixels the reality gets lost. This didn’t stop Avigilon from recently announcing plans for their 29MP camera, and it became apparent that our market is going to continue to run toward megapixel technology regardless of the practical usage. This has some practical business issues. Without hardware technology partners that make Ultra HD displays, workstations, video adapter cards and software, there is no real way to take advantage of these high-end cameras. The industry certainly has figured out the benefits for standard 1080p HD cameras; however, it is still struggling to manage large-scale environments. What is exciting is that including the ecosystem partners’ with 16x multiplier of pixels equates to a 16x multiplier of the system cost. 

 

Ultra High-Definition Defined

The Ultra High Definition TV standard (sometimes referred to as UHDTV, Ultra HDTV, Super Hi-Vision, 8K or 4320p) is 7680 (H) x 4320 (V) or 33.1 MP and is roughly the same as IMAX.  It is going to land someplace above 30 FPS with some in the TV industry thinking as high as 60 FPS. Where the surveillance industry has typically followed the display industry with resolution, the industry is notorious for not following the other aspects of the specifications such as FPS, color and contrast, to name a few. However, resolution is how we measure ourselves, so we are getting close. Time will tell what technology will be used to make the UHDTV market commercially viable. 

 

WQXGA Workstations Designed

Today’s best surveillance displays used in high-end workstations can run at WQXGA, which is 2560 (H) x 1600 (V) and has 4 MP of display power. These 30” displays typically will cost more than $1,500 each and require a special video adapter that cost an additional $500 to take advantage of the full display resolution. To drive more than one display you need to know how to build high-end workstations, as all aspects of the workstation have to be engineered including the motherboard, PCI slots, power, cooling and cable management. A single workstation plus four WQXGA displays can easily run more than $20,000 and have the capability of displaying 16 million pixels of raw video. However, this still displays only half of the 33.1 MP of Ultra High Definition. To achieve that 33.1 MP, the cost would then be at $40,000, and this is 16 times beyond the typical $2,500 cost today. This is a massive growth multiple that is already starting to impact the surveillance market today. Already, A&E specifications are calling for UHDTV video walls using super high-end LCD/LED displays or projection systems. 

 

GPU Software Integration Detailed

In order to make UHDTV a reality the entire video management software industry will need to rewrite their software to include the use of specialized processors, called Graphics Processing Units or GPU’s. These processors, when combined with CPU’s, can take the computationally intensive part of an application and accelerate it by offloading the work to a GPU, which would reside on a specialized video card adapter. For example, video management client software would have to be rewritten to allow the workstation’s CPU to handle the sequential part of the application and send all of the high-end graphics work to the GPU. Milestone was one of the first to develop a partnership with a GPU manufacturer by the name of Matrox and supported up to 16 channels of 1080p HD. Axxonsoft developed an integration with Nvidia also supporting a similar number of channels. These types of integrations will continue to evolve as the market looks to support Ultra High-Definition surveillance cameras. This will drive massive growth measured in pixels, bits, bytes and more importantly, dollars for the industry. All of this ecosystem growth will need to happen before we get to “Ultra High-Definition Evidence.”   

Did you enjoy this article? Click here to subscribe to Security Magazine. 

Recent Articles by Keven Marier

You must login or register in order to post a comment.

Multimedia

Videos

Image Galleries

ASIS 2013 Product Preview

ASIS International 59th Annual Seminar and Exhibits, September 24-27 in Chicago, Illinois, will include an exhibit hall packed with innovative security solutions. Here are some of the products that will be shown at ASIS this year.

Podcasts

Virtualization and Data Center Security: What You Need to Know for 2014

Data centers are increasingly becoming the center of the enterprise, and data center and cyber security is following the same path for security departments. According to Justin Flynn, a consultant at the Burwood Group, the virtualization of data centers allows enterprises to scale more easily and faster, with a smaller footprint.

However, hosting enterprise data in the cloud can make intrusion detection more difficult – how can enterprise security leaders team up with other departments to keep aware of cyber risks and traffic, and physical and data compliance during the virtual transition? How can CISOs and CSOs discuss cyber threats with the C-Suite to get the resources they need? And how can the proper infrastructure test and verify possible malicious attacks? 

More Podcasts

Security Magazine

September 2014

2014 September

In the September issue of Security Magazine, find out who this year's most influential people are in the security industry are. Also, take a peek at the technology products that ASIS 2014 will be showcasing at the upcoming event. Read about the lessons learned from security at the World Cup, find out why tactical medical training is a must for your enterprise and how Atlanta increased security by sharing surveillance.
Table Of Contents Subscribe

Adopting New Technology

How long do you wait before adopting a new technology?
View Results Poll Archive

THE SECURITY STORE

comptiahighriseproductphoto
CompTIA Security+ Certification Study Guide
CompTIA's Security+ certification is a globally-recognized, vendor neutral exam that has helped over 60,000 IT professionals reach further and higher in their careers. The current Security+ exam (SY0-201) focuses more on being able to deal with security issues rather than just identifying them.
More Products

Clear Seas Research

Clear Seas ResearchWith access to over one million professionals and more than 60 industry-specific publications,Clear Seas Research offers relevant insights from those who know your industry best. Let us customize a market research solution that exceeds your marketing goals.

Vertical Sector Focus: Critical Infrastructures

criticalhomepagethumbFrom terrorism to vandalism, it’s preparedness, response, training and partnerships. Learn about some of the critical security issues facing this sector.

Visit the Critical Infrastructure page to read more.  

STAY CONNECTED

Facebook 40px 2-12-13 Twitter logo 40px 2-12-13  YouTube  LinkedIn logo 40px 2-12-13Google+